Beneficial Microbes

There are a handful of microorganisms that do the majority of the work keeping our plants feed and healthy. The final author of all nutrients are bacteria and fungus. All other micro and macro organisms only prepare the decomposing plant or animal material for the final conversion. The below list of microbes come up in conversations about live organic technology. A beginner interested in the subject should have a convenient list with a short description, for easy reference and reminder. Below find the stars of the symbiotic communal players.

Important Beneficial Bacteria

Bacteria are a large group of unicellular or multi-cellular organisms lacking chlorophyll, with a simple nucleus. They multiply rapidly by simple fission. Some species develop a highly resistant resting (spore) phase; some species reproduce sexually, and some are motile. In shape they are spherical, rodlike, spiral, or filamentous. They occur in air, water, soil, rotting organic material, animals and plants. Saprophytic forms are more numerous than parasites. A few forms are autotrophic.  (Walker, 1988)

Important Beneficial Fungus

Fungi  includes some of the most important microbes, ecologically and economically. By breaking down dead organic material, they continue the cycle of nutrients through ecosystems. Most vascular plants could not grow without the symbiotic fungi that entangle their roots and exchange essential nutrients.

Actinomycetes

Actinomycetes

So just when you thought you knew the difference between a fungus and a bacteria… you learn about actinomycetes bacteria. Actinomycetes Bacteria- is a Cellulomonas Bacteria obtaining its name of fame by being very different from other bacteria. It is actually very fungus like because of its long extending hyphae filaments. It is one of the only bacterias that can break down recalcitrant compounds such as cellulose and chitin as a food source. Therefore this makes it a good component of and beneficial microorganism inoculation community. During the process of composting mainly thermophilic (adapted to high temperatures) and thermotolerant actinomycetes are responsible for decomposition of the organic matter at elevated temperatures. In the initial phase of composting the intensive increase of microbial activity leads to a self heating of the organic material. Actinomycetes, like fungi reproduce via spores. The hyphal growth is followed by fragmentation and release of spores produced...

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Lactobascillus Bacteria

Lactobascillus Bacteria

Lactobascillus Bacteria- is rod-shaped workhorse of decomposing organic plant material into smaller units for plant uptake. Any and all organic growers must have this bacterial superstar at hand for inoculating organic soil if that is the medium for your plants propagation.  It acquired its name because its members convert sugars of lactose into lactic acid. The production of lactic acid makes its surroundings where it id busy breaking down decaying plant parts acidic. This checks the growth of other pathogenic bacteria. Depending on the species they have a lifespan from a half to four hours. They are found everywhere and can be cultured by placing water over rice wash, letting it sit for a week and adding milk. The milk will kill all other bacteria other than Lactobasillus. They are used in the production of yoghurt, cheese, kimchi, chocolate, beer, wine, cider, organic fertilizers and...

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Bean Seed Inoculation | Rhizobium Bacteria

Bean Seed Inoculation | Rhizobium Bacteria

Beans Produce their Own Fertilizer Bean Seed Inoculation helps legumes such as peas and beans to “fix” their own nitrogen. Beans produce much of their own nitrogen needs via a symbiotic relationship with a group of  bacteria called rhizobacteria or rhizobium. Rhizobium is a soil bacteria that fix nitrogen for legume plants. Our atmosphere contains more than 75% nitrogen gas (N2).  They convert the nitrogen gas in the atmosphere into ammonia nitrogen NH3+, a form usable by the plant.  Bean Seed Inoculation is important so as to ensure this bacteria-root dance. Colorado State University has a very well written page on Bean Seed Inoculation, if you are interested in reading the technical description of this process. Inoculating the seeds with Rhizobium bacteria before planting is helpful. Multifaceted Symbiosis All legumes, including beans, interact with the Rhizobium and interchanging metabolic fluids. Legume plants have the ability to form a symbiotic relationship with rhizobium bacteria. Inside the nodules, the bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen (N2) to ammonia NH3+, providing organic nitrogenous compounds to the plant. In return, the plant provides the bacteria with organic compounds made by photosynthesis. The bean’s roots exude certain carbohydrates for the bacteria and in return the bacteria produce nutrients. The carbohydrates are basic food stuffs for the bacteria. This encourages the rhizobia to adhere to it. The bacteria multiply on the roots surface and cause more root hairs to grow. On these root hairs begins a process called ‘nodule formation”. The bacteria colonize plant cells within root nodules. Inside these small tumors the bacteria induce specialized genes required for nitrogen fixation. This important function allows bean plants to convert nitrogen from the gaseous form found in the air N2, into a usable form. This allows beans to use this nitrogen for plant growth. Without these beneficial bacteria, beans cannot fix nitrogen. Soils normally do not contain many rhizobium bacteria. So it is necessary to inoculate the legume with the proper strains of bacteria prior to planting the seeds. Bean Seed Inoculation is a low-cost process which returns benefits many times higher than the costs. Bean Seed Inoculation | Rhizobium Bacteria Bean Seed Inoculation couldn’t be easier. There is no special procedure really. Take 500ml of the OST Rhizobium, which contains at least 109 rizobios/gram and add 2 tablespoons of crude sugar. Place your seeds in it for a few minutes. Some seeds like a dunking for a few hours. This all depends on the state of the seeds being planted. Imported, older seeds could need a bit more time to hydrate than fresh seeds recently harvested. Afterwards, just plant the seeds. There is no drenching of soil or anything more to do. If your supply of the inoculate is limited, then you might want to reuse the liquid. Store it away in a cool place for the next batch. It’ is always better to store your containers of fungus and bacterias in the refrigerator if your not performing Bean Seed Inoculation...

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