Beneficial Microbes

There are a handful of microorganisms that do the majority of the work keeping our plants feed and healthy. The final author of all nutrients are bacteria and fungus. All other micro and macro organisms only prepare the decomposing plant or animal material for the final conversion. The below list of microbes come up in conversations about live organic technology. A beginner interested in the subject should have a convenient list with a short description, for easy reference and reminder. Below find the stars of the symbiotic communal players.

Important Beneficial Bacteria

Bacteria are a large group of unicellular or multi-cellular organisms lacking chlorophyll, with a simple nucleus. They multiply rapidly by simple fission. Some species develop a highly resistant resting (spore) phase; some species reproduce sexually, and some are motile. In shape they are spherical, rodlike, spiral, or filamentous. They occur in air, water, soil, rotting organic material, animals and plants. Saprophytic forms are more numerous than parasites. A few forms are autotrophic.  (Walker, 1988)

Important Beneficial Fungus

Fungi  includes some of the most important microbes, ecologically and economically. By breaking down dead organic material, they continue the cycle of nutrients through ecosystems. Most vascular plants could not grow without the symbiotic fungi that entangle their roots and exchange essential nutrients.

Biofertilizer Aquaponics & Biochar

Biofertilizer Aquaponics  & Biochar

Biofertilizers (also known as “plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria” or PGPR) have come on rapidly in “sustainable” agricultural circles, providing eco-friendly organic agro-input. A biofertilizer contains living microorganisms which, when inoculated into biochar or soil, promotes growth by increasing the supply or availability of major nutrients, such as Nitrogen and Phosphorus. Bio-fertilizers add nutrients through the natural processes of nitrogen fixation, solubilizing phosphorus, and stimulating plant growth through the synthesis of growth-promoting bacterial...

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Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Nitrogen-fixation

Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Nitrogen-fixation

Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus General Description Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus (formerly Acetobacter diazotrophicus) is a bacilli, aerobic, obligate endophytic (an endosymbiont), diazotrophic (bacteria that fix atmospheric N) bacterium discovered by Joana Dobereiner (1924 to 2000).  It has been undergoing lab and field tests in research institutions around the globe for the past 50 years, ever since it was first isolated from the phyllosphere as well as the rhizophere of inter-cellular spaces of sugarcane. It was discovered in the high yielding Brazilian sugar cane varieties (e.g. SP...

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Fungus Isaria fumosorosea Controls Flys

Fungus Isaria fumosorosea Controls Flys

 Fungus Isaria fumosorosea General Information  Isaria fumosorosea, was first described as Paecilomyces fumosoroseus by M. Wize in 1904. It is now considered a very effective fungal entomopathogen. It was discovered by M. Wize in a suffering sugar beet weevil in the Ukraine but has a huge distribution range. Isaria fumosorosea is a species complex rather than a single species. This means there are wide variations. Undoubtedly there will be taxonomic revisions of this group in the future (Zimmermann, 2008). Isaria fumosorosea is found in the soil, on plants, in the air, on every continent in...

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Bacillus thurigiensis var israelensis BTI | Larvae Toxin

Bacillus thurigiensis var israelensis BTI  | Larvae Toxin

The following article was gleaned from Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Department of Entomology General Description  Bacillus thurigiensis var israelensis According to Cornell University, there are over 100 species of bacteria that are thought to be pathonogenic to insects. So far very few of these have been studied enough to give us a working relationship with the microbe. But that is not the case with Bacillus thuringiensis. Since the 1960s this microbe has been developed as a microbial insecticide, of which several species are now available in laboratories...

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The Amazing Actinomycete Bacteria

The Amazing Actinomycete Bacteria

The Amazing Actinomycete Bacteria Actinomycetes differ from other soil bacteria in many ways. Actinomycetes develop filaments, almost the same as fungal hyphae. Some researchers believe Actinomycetes use these filaments for connecting themselves together with soil pieces. In doing so, they become too big to be eaten by their enemy the protozoan ciliates. Ciliate protozoans engulf and ingest our friends the aerobic bacteria. The most important note concerning Actinomycetes: they are particularly handy at decaying cellulose and chitin. These are two hard, brown carbon compounds in plants,...

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Pseudomonas fluorescens Phosphate Solubilization

Pseudomonas fluorescens Phosphate Solubilization

Pseudomonas fluorescens General Description Pseudomonas fluorescens is found in many soils throughout the globe but in small numbers. The species name ‘fluorescens’ was coined because of its ability to secrete a soluble, green colored fluorescent pigment called pyoverdin. It is well known that Pseudomonas fluorescens, in association with the plant rhizosphere, is able to exert a beneficial effect upon plant growth. It’s use as biofertilizer and pathogen control agent for microbial-agriculture is a commonly used strain of bacteria because of it’s ability to liberate...

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Springtails a Beneficial Arthropod

Springtails a Beneficial Arthropod

 ”I Have a Springtail Infestation” When I am threw with a grow and replacing the BioChar and substrates in the container to grow another plant, I always keep an eye out for what I can see. I look for differences in root growth and infestations of arthropods. If things were done correctly, I always find Springtails, a beneficial arthropod, dominating the area in the bottom half of the container in the BC.  I find 100′s of thousands of the little white critters springing, walking and bouncing around, wondering who turned the lights on. But not to worry about this particular...

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Beauveria bassiana Entomopathogenic Fungi

Beauveria bassiana Entomopathogenic Fungi

Beauveria bassiana General Information Beauveria bassiana, formerly also known as Tritirachium shiotae, is an entomopathogenic fungus (parasitic to insects) that grows naturally in soils throughout the world.  It acts as a parasite on a very wide variety of arthropods, including, whiteflies, termites, thrips, aphids, beetles,caterpillars, weevils, grasshoppers, ants, mealybugs, bedbugs and even malaria-transmitting mosquitoes. Insects vary in susceptibility to different strains. Strains have been collected from different infected insects and cultured to create a particular product for...

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The Rhizosphere & Beneficial Microorganisms

The Rhizosphere & Beneficial Microorganisms

Living organic soils and the foods you apply to them should not only have large quantities of Beneficial Microorganisms (BM) but a large variety as well. In a few grams of good potting soil you will find hundreds of diverse varieties making up its 1,000,000,000 bacteria. Live Organic Fermented Liquid Fertilizers are bubbling with BMs, which ensure the microbe population is made up of the “good guys”. A large and divers community population will control pathogens. They compete with the pathogens for exudates, nutrients, air, water, and space. If the soil food web is a healthy one,...

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Endophytes Fungi & The Phyllosphere

Endophytes Fungi  & The Phyllosphere

A significant symbiotic partnership among fungi and plants is created by endophytes. Endophytic fungi, in contrast to their subterranean, root loving mycorrhizal fungus, have adjusted to exist in the upper components of plants. They reside in the stems, leave, and bark. Plant surfaces are taken over by countless endophytic fungal varieties. The main reason these types of microbes have escaped researchers awareness for so very long is that nearly all survive inside their host without any noticeable symptoms. Little by little the scientific community focused on the important role of endophytel...

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Bacteria & The Phyllosphere

Bacteria & The Phyllosphere

Prof. Julia Vorholt, Institute of Microbiology at ETH Zurich “One to ten million unicellular microorganisms live on every square centimeter of stems and foliage making the phyllosphere “the largest biological surface inhabited by microorganisms”, explains Prof. Julia Vorholt at the Institute of Microbiology at ETH Zuric. In recent years new investigative tools from microbiology have made it possible to gain a better insight into microorganisms and their function in complex microbe communities. “Two kinds of bacteria dominate this ecosystem, members of the Methylobacterium genus and...

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Paecilomyces lilacinus

Paecilomyces lilacinus

Paecilomyces lilacinus General Description Here in the mountains of Costa Rica, there are whiteflys. Yes, “I have whiteflys!!” So I make the following statement with field experience authority. Paecilomyces lilacinus can be used against the nymphal stages of whiteflys, applied in combination with two other fungus, Isaria fumosorosea and Lecanicillium spp. The latter two of which are effective against the adult whiteflys while the Pae works on the larvae. Applying these three microbes together will bring down significantly the population of larvae and adults both. It’s a...

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Beneficial Microbes in Hydroponics

Beneficial Microbes in Hydroponics

Beneficial Microbes | Pathogen Control One reason soil-less cultures were originally developed was to control soil borne diseases. Soil-less cultures provide several advantages for growers such as greater production of crops, reduced energy consumption, better control of growth and independence of soil quality. But root diseases still occur frequently in hydroponics and disease outbreaks are sometimes greater than in soil (Stanghellini and Rasmussen, 1994). Pythium and Phytophthora sp. are particularly well adapted to aquatic environments. Their growth in soil-less substrates is favored by...

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Bacterial Biofilms

Bacterial Biofilms

Biofilm| Bacterias Natural State When we think of bacteria, beneficial or pathogenic, we imagine a single celled creature swimming independently looking for food. In actuality a bacteria’s natural state is in biofilms, referred to as  plaque or “slime”. The majority of all bacteria on Earth are located in biofim slime, thriving as complex colonies of co-dependent microbes in its self made matrix complete with irrigation and nutrient pathways. Slime or matrix associated microorganisms vastly outnumber organisms in suspension. These surface-bound bacteria behave quite...

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Bacterial Biofilm Water & Ground Treatment

Bacterial Biofilm Water & Ground Treatment

The below article is courtesy of http://biofilmbook.hypertextbookshop.com. It demonstrates two practical uses of a bacterial biofilm. Normally people encounter biofilm (slim) and really don’t know what it is. We all have seen it in it’s worst light. Having a bacterial biofilm on our hydro tanks does pose certain physical problems. It could clog pump lines, for example. But it also has it’s benefits. It is a nitrification dynamo turning organic carbon complexes into simple, soluable nutrients while keeping bacterial pathogens at bay. Water and Wastewater Treatment Engineers...

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Mycorrhizal Fungus

Mycorrhizal Fungus

Mycorrhizal Fungus is one of the most researched fungi. It  has long been recognized as a very important component to plant health. It maintains a symbiotic relationship to more than 80% of all plants. With it’s extensive hyphae network of pseudo-roots, it increases plant water and nutrient uptake 10 to 1000 times. This is why a well planed live organic growing system can create plants bigger, healthier and more nutritious than any chemical regime in existence. This is not an advertising hype, nor an eco-nut rant. One thing however must be soberly understood. A well educated grower in...

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Trichoderma | Astonishing Fungi

Trichoderma |  Astonishing Fungi

Trichoderma Fungus General Description The fungus Trichoderma is a filamentous, free-living fungi that are common in most soils and root ecosystems worldwide. Trichoderma have been found in prairies, forests, salt marshes, desert sands, lake water, dead plant material, seeds and air. They are also found in living roots of virtually any plant (1). Biocontrolfungi of Trichoderma have developed an astonishing ability to interact, both parasitically and symbiotically, in a variety of substrates, plants and with other microbes (2,3). Today Trichodermas is used more extensively in agriculture than...

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Cellulomonas Bacteria

Cellulomonas Bacteria

Research has found that plant photosynthesis produces up to 1.5 x 1011 tons of dry plant material on earth every year. This huge amount of plant material is primarily composed of plant cell wall polymers of lignin, cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectin. The degradation of these enormous amounts of plant cell wall polymers is carried out by microorganisms, the most important being the aerobic Cellomonas Bacteria. This bacteria uses a series of exudents containing enzymes that are specially effective at breaking down cellulose walls. Cellulomonas fimi was one of the first bacteria to have...

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Actinomycetes

Actinomycetes

So just when you thought you knew the difference between a fungus and a bacteria… you learn about actinomycetes bacteria. Actinomycetes Bacteria- is a Cellulomonas Bacteria obtaining its name of fame by being very different from other bacteria. It is actually very fungus like because of its long extending hyphae filaments. It is one of the only bacterias that can break down recalcitrant compounds such as cellulose and chitin as a food source. Therefore this makes it a good component of and beneficial microorganism inoculation community. During the process of composting mainly...

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Lactobascillus Bacteria

Lactobascillus Bacteria

Lactobascillus Bacteria- is rod-shaped workhorse of decomposing organic plant material into smaller units for plant uptake. Any and all organic growers must have this bacterial superstar at hand for inoculating organic soil if that is the medium for your plants propagation.  It acquired its name because its members convert sugars of lactose into lactic acid. The production of lactic acid makes its surroundings where it id busy breaking down decaying plant parts acidic. This checks the growth of other pathogenic bacteria. Depending on the species they have a lifespan from a half to four...

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