1. Selection,
  2. Fermentation,
  3. Filtering,
  4. Extraction,
  5. Formulation,
  6. Field Test,
  7. Packaging,

Research and Development is not only the most important aspect of new products, it is the most rewarding as well. In regards to Live Organic Liquid Fertilizers we have 7 stages that must be functioning optimally before going to market. The abovesteps are done in the order listed in the early stages of development. But many times a loop back must be done in order to correct or improve a later step. You might say something like” back to the drawing board” to describe what I mean.

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Selection of Plants

A bit of pre-research is initially done to see which plants might be good candidates for a particular fertilizer’s “job”. For example, when creating a growth fertilizer for the initial stages of growing a larger amount of nitrogen will be needed, not to mention a list of other major and minor elements. Fish and soya will have a lot of proteins that, when broken down by microorganisms will give us this needed NO2-, nitrate.

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Fermentation by Beneficial Microorganisms

All Organic Fertilizers are made by organic technology. As are many state of the art medicines, only microorganisms can produce these intricate molecules. You might say that the needed nitrogen is a simple molecule and I would have to agree. But being produced by a bacteria not only gives us a special form of nitrogen that the plant can absorb, it is produced in a sustainable low energy method. Beyond the Nitrate needed, microorganisms, will also produce antibiotics, phenols and metabolites that only… only they can formulate. The organisms that are used to make the bio-reactor work are classified as Beneficial Microorganisms or BMs. There are basically two groups of microorganisms, BM and pathogens. Very few BMs will turn on the harmony and become pathogenic . It is a wonder of nature that the two groups are so distinct. Most BM’s work as a colony or group, in unison to create a healthy aura around a plant.

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Filtering The Fermentation

Filtering is merely a mechanical method, to separate the larger undigested particles from the well reacted bio-ferment. There are simple and sophisticated methods to accomplish this. But to keep the manufacturing foot print at a minimum we try to use a simple method that uses simple filtering after a lengthy “curing time”. This curing allows the bio-ferment to complete its organic process.

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Extraction of the Final Components