Ron Finley | guerrilla gardener

A beautiful personality… It’s coming, so lets go.

Read More

Bell Peppers And Your Health

Bell Peppers And Your Health

There is a good reason to eat hot or sweet Bell Peppers for your health and not for just taste alone. When you grow peppers you are raising vitamins on a bush. Not only are they richer in vitamin C than oranges, they are also lower in calories. Growing bell peppers will make all of this nutrition available to you at a cost of just 33 calories per fruit. Nutrition is only the tip of the health iceberg. Refer to the bibliography at the bottom of this page. Peppers are used: used in the treatment of functional dyspepsia used in the in the management of surgical neuropathic pain in cancer patients used in treatment of the post-mastectomy pain syndrome used for cluster headache pain used as pain plaster in chronic non-specific low back pain used in in dermatology for treatment of itching and pain used in treatment of postherpetic neuralgia used to treat painful diabetic neuropathy used in the treatment of prurigo nodularis  jalapeno peppers are used for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection used in the treatment of prurigo nodularisprotects against aspirin-induced gastroduodenal mucosal injury used in the treatment of pain due to fibromyalgia reduces painful osteoarthritis of the hands used in the treatment of arthritis reduce chronic human neuropathic pain Bell peppers are low in calories! So, even if you eat one full cup of them, you get just about 45 calories. One cup will give you more than your daily quota of Vitamin A and C! One large green pepper contains approximately 287 mg of potassium They contain plenty of vitamin C, which powers up your immune system and keeps skin youthful.  The highest amount of Vitamin C in a bell pepper is concentrated in the red variety. Red bell peppers contain several phytochemicals and carotenoids,  particularly beta-carotene, which lavish you with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits. The capsaicin in bell peppers has multiple health benefits. Studies show that it reduces ‘bad’ cholesterol, controls diabetes, brings relief from pain and eases inflammation. If cooked for a short period on low heat, bell peppers retain most of their sweet, almost fruity flavor and flavonoid content, which is a powerful nutrient. The sulfur content in bell peppers makes them play a protective role in certain types of cancers. The bell pepper is a good source of Vitamin E, which is known to play a key role in keeping skin and hair looking youthful. Bell peppers also contain vitamin B6, which is essential for the health of the nervous system and helps renew cells. Certain enzymes in bell peppers, such as lutein, protect the eyes from cataracts and macular degeneration later in life. Bibliography of researched information concerning peppers and our health: 1. McCleane G. Topical application of doxepin hydrochloride, capsaicin and a combination of both produces analgesia in chronic human neuropathic pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2000;49:574-579. 2. Deal CL, Schnitzer TJ, Lipstein E, et al. Treatment of arthritis with topical capsaicin: A double blind trial. Clin Ther. 1991;13:383-395. 3. McCarthy GM, McCarty DJ. Effect of topical capsaicin in the therapy of painful osteoarthritis of the hands. J Rheumatol. 1992;19:604-607. 4. McCarty DJ, Csuka M, McCarthy, et al. Treatment of pain due to fibromyalgia with topical capsaicin: A pilot study. Semin Arthritis Rheum. 1994;23(suppl 3):41-47. 5. Yeoh KG, Kang JY, Yap I, et al. Chili protects against aspirin-induced gastroduodenal mucosal injury in humans. Dig Dis Sci. 1995;40:580-583. 6. Abdel Salam OM, Moszik G, Szolcsanyi J. Studies on the effect of intragastric capsaicin on gastric ulcer and on the prostacyclin-induced cytoprotection in rats. Pharmacol Res. 1995;32:209-215....

Read More