Capsicum Annuum Peppers

Capsicum Annuum Peppers are the most popular and widely grown pepper throughout the world. Annuum are one of the easiest to cross-pollinate with other pepper species. Therefore, it is no wonder why there are so many annuum crosses on the shelves and planters.  Some of the more well known annuum species include all sweet Bell peppers,  most Nu-Mex varrieties, Jalapeños, Thai, Cayenne, Cherry, Pimento and Pasilla's, not to mention the infamous Peter Pepper.

Redskin Dwarf Sweet Pepper

Redskin Dwarf Sweet Pepper

Redskin Dwarf Sweet Pepper General Information  Redskin Sweet pepper is commonly called the ‘Patio Pepper’. That is because the dwarf bush height of 8-14″ is super manageable in a container placed on your patio. The plant is not that tall, well-branched and has a crowded set of exceptionally sweet flavored red fruits hanging around on the bush. The red-red 4- to 5-inch fruit are an an eye catcher in any location, looking huge on this dwarf plant. The bells are symmetrical, with three to four lobes and excellent color. Proof you don’t have to have a large vegetable garden to grow your own. Even the smallest patio or balcony can accommodate a few containers that will give you a bumper crop of delicious fresh organic veggies. Growing Redskin Sweet Dwarf Peppers Plant the seeds on the self watering miniature cup and wait for them to germinate. It should take roughly 15 days to pop up their heads. Three weeks later they will be baby bouncing bushes ready for a hydro-organic container. A smaller to medium sized passive or active hydro container will do. Most bells are easy to grow. The biggest challenge is the Mosaic Tobacco virus, so prevalent when raising peppers. In 60 days after transplanting, your going to be able to ward up the stove or make a “self grown” salad. Using Redskin Sweet Peppers Pick them green or let them mature to rich red, when their vitamin content is at its peak. Their mildly sweet flavor combines easily with many dishes and is also an excellent source of vitamin A. Ideal for stuffing or used fresh in salads. Try serving them grilled, roasted, or stir-fried or preserve them by canning, drying, or freezing. Go to a Yummy Redskin Sweet Pepper & Potatoes Recipe...

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Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant

Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant

Ok… say it 3 times and you can continue. Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant, Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant, Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant, lol Growing Peter’s Penis Pepper Plant Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper, is classified as a, Capsicum annuum var. annuum. As if anybody cared. What people remember about this pepper is when they were 8 years old and it was the first time they realized what-was-what. (I couldn’t help but putting that in).  You wouldn’t believe all the jokes you get with this pepper. Or maybe you would. In any case I bet you have a few of your own that just seam to ooze up out of your unconscious. That is were all the naughty thoughts are hiding and waiting for their big chance. Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant comes (no pun intended) in 3 distinct colors, red, orange and yellow. While maturing, the color goes from it’s infant green to its color, which ever variety you are growing, red, orange of yellow.  The pod of the pepper is wrinkled and has a round tip with a cleft. It is approximately 3 to 4 inches in length, (bigger than my husbands) and 1 to 1.5 inches wide when fully aroused. When fully grown the Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant can grow up to 50 – 70 cm high. They are infamous cousins of the Tabasco pepper and the jalapeno. However, Peter Peppers are hotter than the Tabasco and 10 times hotter than the jalapeno, weighing in at 35,000-55,000 Scoville Heat Units. Growing Peter’s Penis Pepper Plant The more you pick the more the plant will produce peter peppers. Even if you don’t really need them now, you should pick’em and store refrigerate or dry them. Drying peppers is a lot of fun once you are set up for it. It doesn’t take much either. People love to receive them for gifts. Especially the naughty Peter.. It’s is usually grown as an ornamental pepper thanks to what it looks like. Lately some sauces made of it have come on the market. Marketing agencies have a field day promoting this macho-pepper. Can you imagine the attention it gets just by sitting there and looking… well… _ _ _  _....

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NuMex Big Jim Hot Pepper

NuMex Big Jim Hot Pepper

Big Jim Hot Pepper Description Introduced in 1975 by New Mexico State University (NMSU), home of the Chile Pepper Institute and pepper pro Dr. Nakayama. He classified his fruit as Capsicum frutescens longum. It was created from crosses between a Peruvian chile and various large New Mexico Universities  private collection of sweeties. This Big Guy is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the world’s largest pepper. It produces 8″ to 12″ long by 2 ¾” wide, thick, smooth, fleshy fruits. They have high yields of bright green (maturing to deep red), mildly hot fruit. Pungency is variable from plant to plant.  The young green peppers are so mild that they can be used as a green sweet peppers for cooking. It has a Scoville heat unit rating of 500 to 2,500. That is quite a spread I know. Fabian Garcia If your into peppers joining the Chile Pepper Institute created in honor of Fabian Garcia, the father of New Mexico’s pepper industry, if not the father of modern peppers period. NMSU has honored Mexicanborn Don Garcia by naming the 45-acre research center after him. In 1907, Garcia began the chile-breeding work that would lead to the creation of New Mexico’s first standardized variety of the New Mexico chile pepper. People couldn’t depend on the stability, in shape, taste and hotness of the varieties starting to appear on the scene. He set out to creating a pod that growers and consumers could depend on. Garcia made possible mass cultivation of genetically stable chile peppers. This opened the door to the chile-processing and -canning industry. Today, more than 40,000 acres of New Mexico chiles are under cultivation in California, Arizona and Texas. Growing Big Jim Hot Pepper Big Gim likes to grow and is surprisingly small in comparison to the large fruit. The bush can growing between 24″ to 36″ high, with up to 30 pods on a single plant. When fruits have reached full-size they are light green to red. The dark red fruits are fully ripened. It will take approximately 80 days after transplanting seedlings in to containers for the fruit to be mature. Be sure to use a pruning shears or knife to harvest the peppers. If you try pulling them off you cpuld stress the branch. I had a full branch looking at me loose in my hand once. It said “why do you hate me so”. lol  So be patient and loving even with this Big Guy Jim. Us Big Guys need love too. Using & Cooking Big Jim Hot Pepper  It is popular because of the very long, tasty, 10- to 12-inch pods. An obvious choice for chiles rellenos. It’s very mild even though it is classified as a Hot Pepper, so it can be used as a sweet one as well if you want a bit more flavor in your dish. Making Chile Relleno’s toast, peel and take out the seeds from a few ripe chiles stuff them with cheddar cheese  beat two eggs with a dash of salt and a tablespoon of flour  make a light batter dip the stuffed pepper into the batter and fry fry in hot olive or vegetable oil in a skillet drain on paper towels sprinkle with a bit of additional cheese top broil and serve with a fresh...

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Cayenne Blend Pepper Party

Cayenne Blend Pepper Party

Cayenne General Description The Cayenne Blend Pepper group is a fiery mix of long slender peppers 4 to 6″ long, which ripen in a rainbow of colors including purple, green, red and yellow. They have a Scoville capsaician rating of close to 3000. This makes it a mildly hot pepper. For some 3,000 might be very hot, depending on your experience with the spices. But the most interesting thing about Cayenne and all peppers containing Capsaicin, is their medicinal qualities. It has been proven to reduce inflammation, cholesterol, triglyceride levels. Researchers say it fights cancer, prevents heart attacks, Cayenne Peppers Medicinal Qualities Or is the best thing about Cayenne peppers their medicinal qualities Many who are not aware of Cayenne’s medicinal qualities, feel the best thing about Cayenne is they keep their color when dried. So they are perfect for the ornamental appeal when dried and strung. So you can use them as ornaments indoors and out or you can grind them into bold spice mixes. Those persons should go to Shirley’s Wellness Cafe’s website to read up on Dr. Patrick Quillin research. (Excerpt below) True those are all good qualities in a pepper. But I am amazed at the health benefits of Cayenne pepper… truly. Dr. Patrick Quillin “Cayenne pepper – prized for thousands of years for its healing power. Folklore from around the world recounts amazing results using cayenne pepper in simple healing and in baffling health problems. But cayenne pepper is not just a healer from ancient history. Recent clinical studies have been conducted on many of the old-time health applications for this miracle herb. Again and again, the therapeutic value of cayenne pepper has been medically validated.” How to Grow | Cayenne Blend Peppers Harvest the first green fruits early to encourage continued harvests. Better to cut, not pull, the fruit from the stems. Wash hands thoroughly or wear gloves when working with this fruit, as the capsaicin in the pepper is an extreme eye and skin irritant. How to Use the Cayenne Blend Peppers The Cayenne Blend is delicious for fresh eating. You can stuff the small peppers for appetizers or chop them into Mexican dishes and add them to chili, bean bakes, and other casserole-style cuisine. They also do well on the grill, acquiring rich smoky accents when placed right on the hot coals… yes! OR… use fresh in sauces or salsa or dry the thin walled fruit for pepper flakes or to flavor oil and vinegar. There is a long list of ways to use Cayenne peppers. It’s a standard in the pepper fields.  ...

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Mini Bell Mix Sweet Peppers

Mini Bell Mix Sweet Peppers

The dwarf, compact plants of Mini Bell Mix Sweet Peppers produce a nearly seedless heavy set of small 1 ¼” long by 1 ¼”, blocky shaped bells. Pinch out the growing points at 6″ so the plants get bush. They will grow to only 18″ set fruit in different colors, tangerine, red, orange and chocolate. They are early to flower and set fruit constantly. They’re productive and decorative when grown in containers on a sunny patio. They keep well and maintain their crunch. Growing Mini Bell Mix Sweet Peppers  Plant the seeds in a mini auto cup and wait for a couple of weeks to see the tops of their heads. A week or so later, when seedlings are 4 -6″ tall, switch two of them over to a medium 15lt passive or flowing hydro-organic, or 4 to a larger Fincita container. Pinching out the growing points at 6″ will produce plants that are bushy and only 18″ tall. So if you go for the med Hydro-organic container… do it! They require full sun and really don’t mind getting a bit of rain on them. Using Mini Bells Mini Bell Mix Sweet Peppers are real sweeties. As all bells, they are excellent in fresh salads, great on kebabs, stuffed or fried. Below find a few videos you can watch to get up on how to cook with bells. The child’s video is especially interesting if your a mother taking care of your kids on a rainy Saturday morning. It really looks good. You slice up bell rings and plop an egg in the middle over a hot frying pan. I gata try...

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Pasilla Bajio-Chilaca Pepper

Pasilla Bajio-Chilaca Pepper

The Pasilla Bajio-Chilaca Pepper is also known as Chile Negro, or Chilaca when picked fresh. The name, ‘Pasilla’ means ‘little raisin’ in Spanish, referring to the dark brown, wrinkled dried pod. The plant height grows between 75-135 cm tall and produces a large fruit 15 cm in length and 3 cm in diameter. Like all peppers it is astronomically  classified as a Capsicum annum. It carries a very mild Scoville units rating of 200 – 500, making it a mildly hot fruit. The pepper is slightly sweet and has a very distinctive slender 8-12″ long, thin walled, pepper fruit that ripens from dark green to dark brown. When well ripened and used as a dried pod or in powder form, they have a unique rich and full flavor that is the key ingredient in mole, a signature Mexican holiday sauce from the Oaxaca region of Mexico. Growing the Bajio-Chilaca Grow her in a medium to large hydro-organic container. Buy or plant the seeds in a mini hydro cup. The seeds will take up to 3 weeks to germinate and then another 2 more weeks for the roots to fill the soil. By that time the baby bush will be 15cm tall and ready for a medium to large hydro-organic container. 75-80 days after enjoying watching them grow, your goingto be picking and drying the dark brown, banana shaped fruits. Cooking | Pasilla Bajio-Chilaca Pepper Known for it’s rich smoky flavor it can be used to flavor any dish. While its been a long-standing staple ingredient in the Mole sauces of Latin America, this pepper is also gaining favor among Italian chefs as well for its uniquely dense pepper flavor. The pasilla can even create an interesting twist in the flavor and appearance of the standard red-chile enchilada sauce.  It is also a favorite in combination with fruits or accompanying duck, seafood, lamb, mushrooms, garlic, fennel, honey or oregano. Stuffed Pasilla Peppers Recipe This delicious, healthy version of Pasilla Peppers gives you all the satisfaction of restaurant-style Mexican food with lean turkey, reduced fat cheese, black beans and brown rice. Minutes to Prepare: 20 Minutes to Cook: 40 Number of Servings: 4 Ingredients 2 pablano/pasilla peppers1 /2 lb. ground turkey (93% lean) 1 1/2 cups Enchilada Sauce 1 cup refried black beans 1 cup brown rice2 cups water 1 1/2 cup shredded low-fat jack cheese 1 large onion, quartered 1 jalepeno pepper, halved 1 large tomato, quartered 4-5 cloves garlic, peeled 1 bunch cilantro 1 Tbs. olive oilSalt, to taste Pepper, to taste 2 tsp. taco seasoning 1/2 cup non-fat sour cream Directions Turn oven to 350 and bring a medium size saucepan of lightly salted water to boil. Pre-heat large skillet on medium heat (use vent fan, as cooked jalepenos spice up the kitchen). Start rice in rice maker (or on stovetop, if preferred) using two teaspoons of the taco seasoning. In food processor, blend tomato, onion, garlic, cilantro, jalepeno until they are finely minced and mixed. This is your sofrito. Add ground turkey to skillet with sofrito and cook until meat is done and excess moisture is cooked off. Remove from heat and sprinkle with 1/2 cup of the shredded cheese. Halve peppers lengthwise, remove seeds. Immerse in boiling water for three minutes. Remove, drain and pat dry. Place 1/2 cup of the enchilada sauce in the bottom half of a square baking dish. Place halved peppers in the baking dish, spoon in cooked turkey mixture and top evenly with the remaining enchilada sauce and cheese. Bake for 20-30 minutes (until heated through and cheese is melted and browning). Remove and...

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Explosive Ember Hot Ornamental Pepper

Explosive Ember Hot Ornamental Pepper

Explosive Ember is an upright, edible ornamental pepper with unique purple foliage and purple flowers when in full sun. It grows 10″ to 14″ tall and 8″ to 10″ wide. Explosive Ember is versatile, vigorous, and very easy to grow. It is a plant that is both good looking and spicy. Explosive Embers are bushy, well-branched with rigid, brittle stems and thin, narrow, dark green and purple leaves. Before developing into the fruit, their flowers are inconspicuous but flashy, six-petaled purple and give way to cone-shaped, bunching pepper berries. After the blooms pass, the fruit begins to set in clusters of about half a dozen. The small hot peppers are born purple and then turn red and ember, standing above stunning purple and green foliage. On the interior the peppers are divided by spongy ribbing which supports many small, flattened, rounded seeds. The pepper fruits are mild but still hot. The younger fruits are sharper, while the mature peppers are sweeter in taste. It has a rating of 3000 Scoville Units. Plants take 130 – 145 days to produce fruit after planting from seed. Never plant over 1/4″ deep....

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Bolivian Rainbow Chilli Pepper

Bolivian Rainbow Chilli Pepper

Bolivian Rainbow’s  small naturally bushy plants produce 100’s of small, teardrop shaped, hot chillies. Bolivian Rainbow Chilli Pepper produces fruit year around making it a bright and colorful addition to your home’s garden or patio. It produces small five-petaled purple flowers that give way to conical fruits. These small conical fruits turn different colors as they mature. The peppers start out a brilliant purple and turn yellow to orange to red, with all stages of the pepper present on the plant at once. The peppers are small, about 1 inch, and cone-shaped, growing upright on the plant. They somewhat resemble Christmas lights because of their shape and their bright and differing colors. The peppers stand bright against the deep purple-hued stems and leaves of this tall bushy pepper. Bolivian Rainbow peppers can reach up to 18 inches tall and 24 inches wide. It is classified as an ornamental pepper however the fruit is “Hot” and tasty, so use them cautiously. Most of the heat comes from the pithy ribs, inner lining and seeds of the pepper, so keep this in mind when cooking with them. The Bolivian Rainbow’s chiles are delicious in salads or salsas, and can be dried or pickled. Bolivian Rainbow is part of the Capsicum genus. Its scientific name is Capsicum annuum longum group ‘Bolivian Rainbow’ grown for centuries in Bolivia.      ...

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Black Pearl Pepper Plant

Black Pearl Pepper Plant

Black Pearl Pepper’s scientific name is Capsicum annuum longum. It is the blackest pepper ever hybridized. It was developed by arboretum Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit scientists Rob Griesbach and John Stommel of the Agricultural Research Service’s Vegetable Laboratory. Black Pearl is compact, bushy, hot pepper grown for its ornamental beauty more than it’s taste. It is heat tolerant and wants to be planted in the full sun. The pepper grows vigorously 12 to 18 inches tall with approximately the same width. It sets masses of 2cm small round ‘pearl shaped’ pods, which ripens from black to a rich, deep red. Black Pearl’s leaves will start out green but will turn black as soon as they hit full sun. It is considered an annual, which means it typically only grows best for a single growing season, however you can bring it into a second year. In 2006, she was the All-America Selections, Flower Award winner. It was the talk of the...

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