Manzana Roja Rocoto Hot Pepper

Manzana Roja Rocoto Hot Pepper

Manzano (also known as Tree Pepper, Chile Peron, Chile Caballo, and Chile Ciruelo) is a Spanish word meaning “apple”. It is pronounced: mahn zah noh. Manzano chiles are relatives of the hot and spicy South American rocoto peppers. Manzano’s are most often used in their fresh form because the pods are thick and difficult to dry. The manzano apple pepper is unusual in that it has black seeds. It is resistant to low temperatures and is generally grown at high altitudes. It turns to a yellow-orange, then red color when reaching maturity. The Manzano pepper typically rates between 6,000 and 40,000 Scoville units on the Scoville heat...

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Aji Amarillo Peruvian Horror Hot Pepper

Aji Amarillo Peruvian Horror Hot Pepper

 Aji Amarillo is the most frequently used chili in Peru and probably the most important ingredient in Peruvian cooking. The fruits start off green maturing to a deep yellowish orange. Aji Amarillo has a fruity distinguished taste and a medium to hot heat. It’s mostly sold fresh as a whole chili pepper or grounded and find its use in numerous typical Peruvian dishes like the famous Papas a la Huancaina, Aji de Gallina, Causa Limeña and many...

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Redskin Dwarf Sweet Pepper

Redskin Dwarf Sweet Pepper

Redskin Dwarf Sweet Pepper General Information  Redskin Sweet pepper is commonly called the ‘Patio Pepper’. That is because the dwarf bush height of 8-14″ is super manageable in a container placed on your patio. The plant is not that tall, well-branched and has a crowded set of exceptionally sweet flavored red fruits hanging around on the bush. The red-red 4- to 5-inch fruit are an an eye catcher in any location, looking huge on this dwarf plant. The bells are symmetrical, with three to four lobes and excellent color. Proof you don’t have to have a large vegetable garden to grow your own. Even the smallest patio or balcony can accommodate a few containers that will give you a bumper crop of delicious fresh organic veggies. Growing Redskin Sweet Dwarf Peppers Plant the seeds on the self watering miniature cup and wait for them to germinate. It should take roughly 15 days to pop up their heads. Three weeks later they will be baby bouncing bushes ready for a hydro-organic container. A smaller to medium sized passive or active hydro container will do. Most bells are easy to grow. The biggest challenge is the Mosaic Tobacco virus, so prevalent when raising peppers. In 60 days after transplanting, your going to be able to ward up the stove or make a “self grown” salad. Using Redskin Sweet Peppers Pick them green or let them mature to rich red, when their vitamin content is at its peak. Their mildly sweet flavor combines easily with many dishes and is also an excellent source of vitamin A. Ideal for stuffing or used fresh in salads. Try serving them grilled, roasted, or stir-fried or preserve them by canning, drying, or freezing. Go to a Yummy Redskin Sweet Pepper & Potatoes Recipe...

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How to Dry Peppers

How to Dry Peppers

Why Dry Hot Peppers How to Dry Peppers is a noble mission, but Why? The biggest reason people would want to dry peppers is for storage. That’s a no brainier. But why would you want to store them and why dry? Because you have a bumper crop and need them for spices and medicinal remedies that are inherent in capsaicim. Freezing is fine but the defrosting at times is a problem. Besides, dry pepper is a very convenient way to use peppers. They can then be made into powder for cooking or capsules and wraps for cures. They don’t require valuable real estate in your refrigerator nor freezer. Removing moisture from peppers will magnify and intensify the heat from the capsaisim and enhance flavors and natural sugars it contains. Dehydrated peppers pack a bigger bite in both solid food and hot sauce recipes than fresh peppers. Did I convince you to dry them? You were already going to dry them?… Ok, then lets proceed… with caution. Warning About Drying Peppers Please read this!! Even before you learn How to Dry Peppers, you should know how strong peppers particles can get. The capsiacin is a very strong chemical. The hotter the pepper the more capsaicin it will contain. If your not familiar with the Scoville Unites review, perhaps you should catch up on it. It is a way to rate the hotness of peppers, the capsiacin it contains. Take precautions when preparing fresh peppers and when drying the fruits. Wear protective gloves, goggles and a dust mask when grinding pepper pods after the drying process and during the grinding work. I cant stress that enough. If possible do this work outdoors. Be sure not to scratch your eyes, nose, face, or “anything else” after handling. Scrub your hands really well afterwards with soap and water. Take extra precaution around young children and cuddly pets. . Different Ways on How to Dry Peppers How to Dry Peppers… what a joke. It is almost impossible to NOT dry a pepper pod. Let me count the ways to dry peppers and you can mix and match the methods, turn them around and upside down. It can’t not work. So feel free to be free and read the following, “Ways to Dry Peppers.” Hang Dry the Entire Pepper Plant     The simplest method to dry peppers.  The success of an outside or garage hang-drying is going to depend on your regional climate. If it is convenient and you are ready to take the whole plant up, simply cut her off at ground level and hang the entire plant in the garage. It will take months for the plant to dry. In the mean time the peppers normally stay fresh and colorful for longer than they would in the refrigerator. You can use them to make stuffed peppers for quite a while before they get too dry for that recipe. The humidity in your garage or area, cant be extremely high. But it’s is a good method for you to try. There is almost no work involved. Hang Dry Only Pepper Pods     The most popular method to dry peppers. Look over your individual peppers well. discard the ones that have a bad spot, damage or anything that will make it go bad prematurely. Coat the pods with a fine film of olive oil and string them up by the stems. You can wrap the string with a tight knot of better yet use a needle and thin fishing line. Leave plenty of roam between them for new air and sun to get to.  Hang...

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Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant

Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant

Ok… say it 3 times and you can continue. Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant, Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant, Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant, lol Growing Peter’s Penis Pepper Plant Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper, is classified as a, Capsicum annuum var. annuum. As if anybody cared. What people remember about this pepper is when they were 8 years old and it was the first time they realized what-was-what. (I couldn’t help but putting that in).  You wouldn’t believe all the jokes you get with this pepper. Or maybe you would. In any case I bet you have a few of your own that just seam to ooze up out of your unconscious. That is were all the naughty thoughts are hiding and waiting for their big chance. Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant comes (no pun intended) in 3 distinct colors, red, orange and yellow. While maturing, the color goes from it’s infant green to its color, which ever variety you are growing, red, orange of yellow.  The pod of the pepper is wrinkled and has a round tip with a cleft. It is approximately 3 to 4 inches in length, (bigger than my husbands) and 1 to 1.5 inches wide when fully aroused. When fully grown the Peter’s Naughty Penis Pepper Plant can grow up to 50 – 70 cm high. They are infamous cousins of the Tabasco pepper and the jalapeno. However, Peter Peppers are hotter than the Tabasco and 10 times hotter than the jalapeno, weighing in at 35,000-55,000 Scoville Heat Units. Growing Peter’s Penis Pepper Plant The more you pick the more the plant will produce peter peppers. Even if you don’t really need them now, you should pick’em and store refrigerate or dry them. Drying peppers is a lot of fun once you are set up for it. It doesn’t take much either. People love to receive them for gifts. Especially the naughty Peter.. It’s is usually grown as an ornamental pepper thanks to what it looks like. Lately some sauces made of it have come on the market. Marketing agencies have a field day promoting this macho-pepper. Can you imagine the attention it gets just by sitting there and looking… well… _ _ _  _....

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NuMex Big Jim Hot Pepper

NuMex Big Jim Hot Pepper

Big Jim Hot Pepper Description Introduced in 1975 by New Mexico State University (NMSU), home of the Chile Pepper Institute and pepper pro Dr. Nakayama. He classified his fruit as Capsicum frutescens longum. It was created from crosses between a Peruvian chile and various large New Mexico Universities  private collection of sweeties. This Big Guy is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the world’s largest pepper. It produces 8″ to 12″ long by 2 ¾” wide, thick, smooth, fleshy fruits. They have high yields of bright green (maturing to deep red), mildly hot fruit. Pungency is variable from plant to plant.  The young green peppers are so mild that they can be used as a green sweet peppers for cooking. It has a Scoville heat unit rating of 500 to 2,500. That is quite a spread I know. Fabian Garcia If your into peppers joining the Chile Pepper Institute created in honor of Fabian Garcia, the father of New Mexico’s pepper industry, if not the father of modern peppers period. NMSU has honored Mexicanborn Don Garcia by naming the 45-acre research center after him. In 1907, Garcia began the chile-breeding work that would lead to the creation of New Mexico’s first standardized variety of the New Mexico chile pepper. People couldn’t depend on the stability, in shape, taste and hotness of the varieties starting to appear on the scene. He set out to creating a pod that growers and consumers could depend on. Garcia made possible mass cultivation of genetically stable chile peppers. This opened the door to the chile-processing and -canning industry. Today, more than 40,000 acres of New Mexico chiles are under cultivation in California, Arizona and Texas. Growing Big Jim Hot Pepper Big Gim likes to grow and is surprisingly small in comparison to the large fruit. The bush can growing between 24″ to 36″ high, with up to 30 pods on a single plant. When fruits have reached full-size they are light green to red. The dark red fruits are fully ripened. It will take approximately 80 days after transplanting seedlings in to containers for the fruit to be mature. Be sure to use a pruning shears or knife to harvest the peppers. If you try pulling them off you cpuld stress the branch. I had a full branch looking at me loose in my hand once. It said “why do you hate me so”. lol  So be patient and loving even with this Big Guy Jim. Us Big Guys need love too. Using & Cooking Big Jim Hot Pepper  It is popular because of the very long, tasty, 10- to 12-inch pods. An obvious choice for chiles rellenos. It’s very mild even though it is classified as a Hot Pepper, so it can be used as a sweet one as well if you want a bit more flavor in your dish. Making Chile Relleno’s toast, peel and take out the seeds from a few ripe chiles stuff them with cheddar cheese  beat two eggs with a dash of salt and a tablespoon of flour  make a light batter dip the stuffed pepper into the batter and fry fry in hot olive or vegetable oil in a skillet drain on paper towels sprinkle with a bit of additional cheese top broil and serve with a fresh...

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Jamaican Hot Chocolate Habenero Pepper

Jamaican Hot Chocolate Habenero Pepper

Here we have a delicious looking dish of dried Hot Jamaican Chocolate chilli peppers Any time you have a brown pepper you will find at some point a few red ones growing in the patch, if it is big enough. Brown is a color genetically related to red. Red being the recessive gene. You can see the pepper expert Rick Hess go threw a Jamaican Hot Pepper Review. Here is a quote from his comments. “It is painful, and I’m not sure why I go through the pain.” Well most likely for fun Rick. I don’t see anyone going threw something like that for money. Hot Jamaican Pepper General Description Hailing from the Scotch Bonnet family in Jamaica, the deadly hot Chocolate Habanero ranks among the notorious few at the top of the heat scale racking up 450,000 scoville heat units. The Chilli Pepper Institute of New Mexico State University reported that the Chocolate Habanero Chile was the hottest chilli pepper. But that was two years ago. New varieties, hotter than the years before, are popping up around every corner. This Jamaican variety for some reason, is also known as the ‘Congo black’. Because it is sometimes hard to differentiate, many are unclear whether the Jamaican Hot Chocolate plants, are actually habaneros, Scotch Bonnets, or their own variety. But one thing is clear, they are a close relative to the habanero, a member of Capsicum chinense. The 2 inch peppers ripen from a deep green to a gorgeous, chocolate brown about 90 days after transplanting. Cooking with Jamaican Hot Chocolate The fruits have a unique, rich flavor. The smokiness is unequaled by any other pepper. It’s the ultimate salsa pepper. They have a Caribbean, smoky flavor, which makes them delicious in salsas or the popular Jamaican Jerk sauce or marinade.  ...

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The Devil Tongue Hot Chile Pepper Made Me Do It

The Devil Tongue Hot Chile Pepper Made Me Do It

Devils Tongue hot pepper comes in yellow, gold, red and even chocolate. Some people just can’t pass up an “I dare you to do it”, when it comes to eating a hot, hot chile pepper. In the video above, you can check out two young, crazies, hot-heads who eat a Devils Tongue Hot Pepper whole… seeds and all. It has over 300,000 Scoville Units of Heat Devil’s Tongue Pepper  General Description The Devil Tongue Hot Chile Pepper, is currently considered the 7th hottest pepper on this planet. It was supposedly found growing amongst other habaneros by a farmer of the Amish people in Pennsylvania. It is clearly in the habanero family based on its taste and heat level. The Habanero fruits have a very fruity spicy flavor. Devil’s Tongue peppers have been measured as high as 325,000 Scoville heat units. Their bright yellow wrinkly pods make Devil’s Tongue peppers easy to spot when ripe. The plant is large, 30 to 36 inches tall, with fruit 2 to 3″ long by 1 to 1.5″ wide. The pepper matures from green to golden yellow, has pendant pods with green leaves....

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Cayenne Blend Pepper Party

Cayenne Blend Pepper Party

Cayenne General Description The Cayenne Blend Pepper group is a fiery mix of long slender peppers 4 to 6″ long, which ripen in a rainbow of colors including purple, green, red and yellow. They have a Scoville capsaician rating of close to 3000. This makes it a mildly hot pepper. For some 3,000 might be very hot, depending on your experience with the spices. But the most interesting thing about Cayenne and all peppers containing Capsaicin, is their medicinal qualities. It has been proven to reduce inflammation, cholesterol, triglyceride levels. Researchers say it fights cancer, prevents heart attacks, Cayenne Peppers Medicinal Qualities Or is the best thing about Cayenne peppers their medicinal qualities Many who are not aware of Cayenne’s medicinal qualities, feel the best thing about Cayenne is they keep their color when dried. So they are perfect for the ornamental appeal when dried and strung. So you can use them as ornaments indoors and out or you can grind them into bold spice mixes. Those persons should go to Shirley’s Wellness Cafe’s website to read up on Dr. Patrick Quillin research. (Excerpt below) True those are all good qualities in a pepper. But I am amazed at the health benefits of Cayenne pepper… truly. Dr. Patrick Quillin “Cayenne pepper – prized for thousands of years for its healing power. Folklore from around the world recounts amazing results using cayenne pepper in simple healing and in baffling health problems. But cayenne pepper is not just a healer from ancient history. Recent clinical studies have been conducted on many of the old-time health applications for this miracle herb. Again and again, the therapeutic value of cayenne pepper has been medically validated.” How to Grow | Cayenne Blend Peppers Harvest the first green fruits early to encourage continued harvests. Better to cut, not pull, the fruit from the stems. Wash hands thoroughly or wear gloves when working with this fruit, as the capsaicin in the pepper is an extreme eye and skin irritant. How to Use the Cayenne Blend Peppers The Cayenne Blend is delicious for fresh eating. You can stuff the small peppers for appetizers or chop them into Mexican dishes and add them to chili, bean bakes, and other casserole-style cuisine. They also do well on the grill, acquiring rich smoky accents when placed right on the hot coals… yes! OR… use fresh in sauces or salsa or dry the thin walled fruit for pepper flakes or to flavor oil and vinegar. There is a long list of ways to use Cayenne peppers. It’s a standard in the pepper fields.  ...

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Pretty Purple Ornamental Hot Pepper

Pretty Purple Ornamental Hot Pepper

General Characteristics of the Pretty Purple Pepper Plant Say it thrice: Pretty Purple Pepper Plant Pretty Purple Pepper Plant Pretty Purple Pepper Plant Pretty Purple is one variety of a purple pepper that is both ornamental and hot. The plant is taller  than most ornamental standing at nearly 60cm when mature. The peppers start out green, immediately turns to purple and finally gives us a medium hot pepper (Scoville Unit Scale 1100+/-) when mature. The foliage is green with tints of purple showing off the violet-colored flowers.  It will do nicely in a medium hydro-organico passive or flowing container of about 15lt in volume. How to Grow The Purple Pepper Like most peppers it will take a couple of weeks after planting the seed to see the little seedlings pop up. Then perhaps another 80 days for a full bush of fruit. All peppers prefer full su, so lets put t out in the patio with no roof. You can use the containers built in transparent roof to keep her dry. Even though pepper plants take rain well, a roof will keep the container from catching the rain and getting too full. But no problem with no roof as well. The passive containers have an overspill outlet. The water level indicator at the bottom of the pot, will bail the water in the pot after reaching the top of the tube....

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Mini Bell Mix Sweet Peppers

Mini Bell Mix Sweet Peppers

The dwarf, compact plants of Mini Bell Mix Sweet Peppers produce a nearly seedless heavy set of small 1 ¼” long by 1 ¼”, blocky shaped bells. Pinch out the growing points at 6″ so the plants get bush. They will grow to only 18″ set fruit in different colors, tangerine, red, orange and chocolate. They are early to flower and set fruit constantly. They’re productive and decorative when grown in containers on a sunny patio. They keep well and maintain their crunch. Growing Mini Bell Mix Sweet Peppers  Plant the seeds in a mini auto cup and wait for a couple of weeks to see the tops of their heads. A week or so later, when seedlings are 4 -6″ tall, switch two of them over to a medium 15lt passive or flowing hydro-organic, or 4 to a larger Fincita container. Pinching out the growing points at 6″ will produce plants that are bushy and only 18″ tall. So if you go for the med Hydro-organic container… do it! They require full sun and really don’t mind getting a bit of rain on them. Using Mini Bells Mini Bell Mix Sweet Peppers are real sweeties. As all bells, they are excellent in fresh salads, great on kebabs, stuffed or fried. Below find a few videos you can watch to get up on how to cook with bells. The child’s video is especially interesting if your a mother taking care of your kids on a rainy Saturday morning. It really looks good. You slice up bell rings and plop an egg in the middle over a hot frying pan. I gata try...

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Pasilla Bajio-Chilaca Pepper

Pasilla Bajio-Chilaca Pepper

The Pasilla Bajio-Chilaca Pepper is also known as Chile Negro, or Chilaca when picked fresh. The name, ‘Pasilla’ means ‘little raisin’ in Spanish, referring to the dark brown, wrinkled dried pod. The plant height grows between 75-135 cm tall and produces a large fruit 15 cm in length and 3 cm in diameter. Like all peppers it is astronomically  classified as a Capsicum annum. It carries a very mild Scoville units rating of 200 – 500, making it a mildly hot fruit. The pepper is slightly sweet and has a very distinctive slender 8-12″ long, thin walled, pepper fruit that ripens from dark green to dark brown. When well ripened and used as a dried pod or in powder form, they have a unique rich and full flavor that is the key ingredient in mole, a signature Mexican holiday sauce from the Oaxaca region of Mexico. Growing the Bajio-Chilaca Grow her in a medium to large hydro-organic container. Buy or plant the seeds in a mini hydro cup. The seeds will take up to 3 weeks to germinate and then another 2 more weeks for the roots to fill the soil. By that time the baby bush will be 15cm tall and ready for a medium to large hydro-organic container. 75-80 days after enjoying watching them grow, your goingto be picking and drying the dark brown, banana shaped fruits. Cooking | Pasilla Bajio-Chilaca Pepper Known for it’s rich smoky flavor it can be used to flavor any dish. While its been a long-standing staple ingredient in the Mole sauces of Latin America, this pepper is also gaining favor among Italian chefs as well for its uniquely dense pepper flavor. The pasilla can even create an interesting twist in the flavor and appearance of the standard red-chile enchilada sauce.  It is also a favorite in combination with fruits or accompanying duck, seafood, lamb, mushrooms, garlic, fennel, honey or oregano. Stuffed Pasilla Peppers Recipe This delicious, healthy version of Pasilla Peppers gives you all the satisfaction of restaurant-style Mexican food with lean turkey, reduced fat cheese, black beans and brown rice. Minutes to Prepare: 20 Minutes to Cook: 40 Number of Servings: 4 Ingredients 2 pablano/pasilla peppers1 /2 lb. ground turkey (93% lean) 1 1/2 cups Enchilada Sauce 1 cup refried black beans 1 cup brown rice2 cups water 1 1/2 cup shredded low-fat jack cheese 1 large onion, quartered 1 jalepeno pepper, halved 1 large tomato, quartered 4-5 cloves garlic, peeled 1 bunch cilantro 1 Tbs. olive oilSalt, to taste Pepper, to taste 2 tsp. taco seasoning 1/2 cup non-fat sour cream Directions Turn oven to 350 and bring a medium size saucepan of lightly salted water to boil. Pre-heat large skillet on medium heat (use vent fan, as cooked jalepenos spice up the kitchen). Start rice in rice maker (or on stovetop, if preferred) using two teaspoons of the taco seasoning. In food processor, blend tomato, onion, garlic, cilantro, jalepeno until they are finely minced and mixed. This is your sofrito. Add ground turkey to skillet with sofrito and cook until meat is done and excess moisture is cooked off. Remove from heat and sprinkle with 1/2 cup of the shredded cheese. Halve peppers lengthwise, remove seeds. Immerse in boiling water for three minutes. Remove, drain and pat dry. Place 1/2 cup of the enchilada sauce in the bottom half of a square baking dish. Place halved peppers in the baking dish, spoon in cooked turkey mixture and top evenly with the remaining enchilada sauce and cheese. Bake for 20-30 minutes (until heated through and cheese is melted and browning). Remove and...

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Explosive Ember Hot Ornamental Pepper

Explosive Ember Hot Ornamental Pepper

Explosive Ember is an upright, edible ornamental pepper with unique purple foliage and purple flowers when in full sun. It grows 10″ to 14″ tall and 8″ to 10″ wide. Explosive Ember is versatile, vigorous, and very easy to grow. It is a plant that is both good looking and spicy. Explosive Embers are bushy, well-branched with rigid, brittle stems and thin, narrow, dark green and purple leaves. Before developing into the fruit, their flowers are inconspicuous but flashy, six-petaled purple and give way to cone-shaped, bunching pepper berries. After the blooms pass, the fruit begins to set in clusters of about half a dozen. The small hot peppers are born purple and then turn red and ember, standing above stunning purple and green foliage. On the interior the peppers are divided by spongy ribbing which supports many small, flattened, rounded seeds. The pepper fruits are mild but still hot. The younger fruits are sharper, while the mature peppers are sweeter in taste. It has a rating of 3000 Scoville Units. Plants take 130 – 145 days to produce fruit after planting from seed. Never plant over 1/4″ deep....

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Hot Pepper Scoville Unit

Hot Pepper Scoville Unit

 The Scoville Organoleptic Unit Test Wilbur Scoville lived from 1865-1942. Professor: Massachusetts College of Pharmacy (1892-1904) Wilbur Scoville is famous for his heat scale work at Park Davis, a Detroit-based pharmaceutical company, where he devised a heat scale for peppers. This test is named after him, the Scoville Organoleptic Test. Originally, Scoville ratings were based on human response to progressive dilutions. Scoville blended pure ground chiles with a sugar-water solution and a panel of testers then sipped the concoctions, in increasingly diluted concentrations. They reach a point at which the liquid no longer burned the mouth. A number was then assigned to each chile based on how much it needed to be diluted before you could taste no heat. The American Pharmaceutical Association awarded Scoville the Ebert Prize in 1922, and the Remington Honor Medal in 1929, though likely these awards had nothing to do with his eponym. Scoville Units Popular Pepper Varieties 0-100 Scoville Units includes most Bell & Sweet pepper varieties. 500-1000 Scoville Units includes New Mexican peppers. 1,000-1,500 Scoville Units includes Espanola peppers. 1,000-2,000 Scoville Units includes Ancho & Pasilla peppers. 1,000-2,500 Scoville Units includes Cascabel & Cherry peppers. 2,500-5,000 Scoville Units includes Jalapeno & Mirasol peppers. 5,000-15,000 Scoville Units includes Serrano peppers. 15,000-30,000 Scoville Units includes de Arbol peppers. 30,000-50,000 Scoville Units includes Cayenne & Tabasco peppers. 50,000-100,000 Scoville Units includes Chiltepin peppers 100,000-350,000 Scoville Units includes Scotch Bonnet & Thai peppers. 200,000 to 300,000 Scoville Units includes Habanero peppers. 1,000,000 to 2,000,000 Scoville Units includes all the world class C. chinense varieties originating mostly from a particular Trinidadian strain. 16,000,000+ Scoville Units is Pure Capsaicin. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Test (HPLC) The validity and accuracy of the Scoville Unit test have been widely criticized. Today the High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) test is used in research sittuations. Pepper pods are dried and ground. The chemicals responsible for the pungency, capsaicin are extracted. The extract is injected into the HPLC machine for analysis. This method is more costly than the the human version. However it allows for an objective heat analysis. Not only does this method measure the total heat present, but it also gives the quantity of the different capsaicinoids. Do Hot Peppers Damage the Tongue Can very hot peppers have the potential to damage taste buds? “Not true”. Says Dr. Paul Bosland, professor of horticulture at New Mexico State University and author or several books on hot peppers. “We should think of chile heat like we do the taste of salt; easy to overdo in the moment, but not damaging to your mouth over the long term. Even the hottest habanero (100,000–350,000 on the Scoville scale), which can stay on your palate for hours — if not days –  won’t wear out your tender buds.” Bosland and his colleagues have broken the heat profile of chile peppers into five distinctly different characteristics. 1) how hot it is, 2) how fast the heat comes on, 3) whether it linger or dissipates quickly, 4) where you sense the heat – on the tip of tongue, at the back of throat, etc., and 5) whether the heat registers as “flat” or “sharp.”   Read more:...

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Bolivian Rainbow Chilli Pepper

Bolivian Rainbow Chilli Pepper

Bolivian Rainbow’s  small naturally bushy plants produce 100’s of small, teardrop shaped, hot chillies. Bolivian Rainbow Chilli Pepper produces fruit year around making it a bright and colorful addition to your home’s garden or patio. It produces small five-petaled purple flowers that give way to conical fruits. These small conical fruits turn different colors as they mature. The peppers start out a brilliant purple and turn yellow to orange to red, with all stages of the pepper present on the plant at once. The peppers are small, about 1 inch, and cone-shaped, growing upright on the plant. They somewhat resemble Christmas lights because of their shape and their bright and differing colors. The peppers stand bright against the deep purple-hued stems and leaves of this tall bushy pepper. Bolivian Rainbow peppers can reach up to 18 inches tall and 24 inches wide. It is classified as an ornamental pepper however the fruit is “Hot” and tasty, so use them cautiously. Most of the heat comes from the pithy ribs, inner lining and seeds of the pepper, so keep this in mind when cooking with them. The Bolivian Rainbow’s chiles are delicious in salads or salsas, and can be dried or pickled. Bolivian Rainbow is part of the Capsicum genus. Its scientific name is Capsicum annuum longum group ‘Bolivian Rainbow’ grown for centuries in Bolivia.      ...

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Black Pearl Pepper Plant

Black Pearl Pepper Plant

Black Pearl Pepper’s scientific name is Capsicum annuum longum. It is the blackest pepper ever hybridized. It was developed by arboretum Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit scientists Rob Griesbach and John Stommel of the Agricultural Research Service’s Vegetable Laboratory. Black Pearl is compact, bushy, hot pepper grown for its ornamental beauty more than it’s taste. It is heat tolerant and wants to be planted in the full sun. The pepper grows vigorously 12 to 18 inches tall with approximately the same width. It sets masses of 2cm small round ‘pearl shaped’ pods, which ripens from black to a rich, deep red. Black Pearl’s leaves will start out green but will turn black as soon as they hit full sun. It is considered an annual, which means it typically only grows best for a single growing season, however you can bring it into a second year. In 2006, she was the All-America Selections, Flower Award winner. It was the talk of the...

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Bell Peppers And Your Health

Bell Peppers And Your Health

There is a good reason to eat hot or sweet Bell Peppers for your health and not for just taste alone. When you grow peppers you are raising vitamins on a bush. Not only are they richer in vitamin C than oranges, they are also lower in calories. Growing bell peppers will make all of this nutrition available to you at a cost of just 33 calories per fruit. Nutrition is only the tip of the health iceberg. Refer to the bibliography at the bottom of this page. Peppers are used: used in the treatment of functional dyspepsia used in the in the management of surgical neuropathic pain in cancer patients used in treatment of the post-mastectomy pain syndrome used for cluster headache pain used as pain plaster in chronic non-specific low back pain used in in dermatology for treatment of itching and pain used in treatment of postherpetic neuralgia used to treat painful diabetic neuropathy used in the treatment of prurigo nodularis  jalapeno peppers are used for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection used in the treatment of prurigo nodularisprotects against aspirin-induced gastroduodenal mucosal injury used in the treatment of pain due to fibromyalgia reduces painful osteoarthritis of the hands used in the treatment of arthritis reduce chronic human neuropathic pain Bell peppers are low in calories! So, even if you eat one full cup of them, you get just about 45 calories. One cup will give you more than your daily quota of Vitamin A and C! One large green pepper contains approximately 287 mg of potassium They contain plenty of vitamin C, which powers up your immune system and keeps skin youthful.  The highest amount of Vitamin C in a bell pepper is concentrated in the red variety. Red bell peppers contain several phytochemicals and carotenoids,  particularly beta-carotene, which lavish you with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits. The capsaicin in bell peppers has multiple health benefits. Studies show that it reduces ‘bad’ cholesterol, controls diabetes, brings relief from pain and eases inflammation. If cooked for a short period on low heat, bell peppers retain most of their sweet, almost fruity flavor and flavonoid content, which is a powerful nutrient. The sulfur content in bell peppers makes them play a protective role in certain types of cancers. The bell pepper is a good source of Vitamin E, which is known to play a key role in keeping skin and hair looking youthful. Bell peppers also contain vitamin B6, which is essential for the health of the nervous system and helps renew cells. Certain enzymes in bell peppers, such as lutein, protect the eyes from cataracts and macular degeneration later in life. Bibliography of researched information concerning peppers and our health: 1. McCleane G. Topical application of doxepin hydrochloride, capsaicin and a combination of both produces analgesia in chronic human neuropathic pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2000;49:574-579. 2. Deal CL, Schnitzer TJ, Lipstein E, et al. Treatment of arthritis with topical capsaicin: A double blind trial. Clin Ther. 1991;13:383-395. 3. McCarthy GM, McCarty DJ. Effect of topical capsaicin in the therapy of painful osteoarthritis of the hands. J Rheumatol. 1992;19:604-607. 4. McCarty DJ, Csuka M, McCarthy, et al. Treatment of pain due to fibromyalgia with topical capsaicin: A pilot study. Semin Arthritis Rheum. 1994;23(suppl 3):41-47. 5. Yeoh KG, Kang JY, Yap I, et al. Chili protects against aspirin-induced gastroduodenal mucosal injury in humans. Dig Dis Sci. 1995;40:580-583. 6. Abdel Salam OM, Moszik G, Szolcsanyi J. Studies on the effect of intragastric capsaicin on gastric ulcer and on the prostacyclin-induced cytoprotection in rats. Pharmacol Res. 1995;32:209-215....

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