Bush Beans | The Modern Bean

Bush Beans were "invented" by man, when he first decided to grow food because his big feet hurt from waking the Earth. Sound familiar? We haven't changed that much in 100,000 years. We invented a few new varieties of beans, went to the moon and back, shop at the local WallMart and still our big feet hurt. So hybridizing a few plants more than a few hundred years ago didn't help my feet much, but I do enjoy the Purple Bush Bean.

Red Mexican Bush Beans | General Overview

Red Mexican Bush Beans | General Overview

Mexican Bush Bean Description The Red Mexican Dry Bush Bean (Fabaceae Phaseolus vulgaris)  also known as “Montezuma’s Red,”most everyone is familiar with. Why? Because it is an abundant producer, hardy and easy to grow. Above all it is a pleasure to cook with.  It became ea favorite in southern California way back in 1855. I would imagine it jumped the Rio Grand into southern USA when the cowboys were still in control of the frontier. Dry beans traveled well in the saddle-bag. I am sure. You might be more interested in their texture and taste. Mexican Bush Bean Cooking and Nutrition Weather making soup, baking or canning, this big guy bean holds it’s shape and never gets soggy. So let’s rock with the Mexicans and their cool bush bean. Beans are rich in iron and potassium. They have all the carbs you could want with a bunch of protein as well. If you don’t add it to the recipe there will be no fat content. The basic carb-fat-protein count is roughly 16-0-8. You’ll find dozens of recipes for Black Beans and not so many for Big Red. But look here for a recipe from The Bush Family.   Caribbean BBQ Beans Prep: 15 Minutes | Cook: 20 Minutes | Total: 35 Minutes 8 1 tablespoon olive oil 7 ounces pulled pork or chorizo (casing removed) 1 medium onion, diced 4 cloves garlic, chopped 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped 1/2 cup ketchup 1/2 cup molasses 1/4 cup Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1 tablespoon hot sauce (or more to taste) 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 32 ounce precooked Red Beans Directions Heat oil in a 10-inch skillet over medium heat. Cook pulled pork or chorizo until browned. Drain; transfer meat to plate. Add onion, garlic and jalapeno to skillet; cook about 3 minutes or until onion is tender. Stir in ketchup, molasses, mustard, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce, hot sauce and ginger. Return meat to skillet and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and cook 2 minutes. Stir in beans. Simmer over low heat 15 minutes; stir occasionally. Serve warm. Bean & Veggie Pitas Prep: 20 Minutes | Cook: 0 Minutes | Feed 6 People 2 cups thinly sliced red cabbage 1 1/2 cups canned red beans, rinsed and drained 1 (10 ounce) can diced tomatoes with green chilies, drained 1 cup fresh or frozen corn 1/2 cup diced zucchini 1/2 cup diced yellow summer squash 1/4 cup finely chopped onion 1 tablespoon minced fresh cilantro 1 tablespoon lime juice DIJON DRESSING: 3 tablespoons olive or canola oil 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar or cider vinegar 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon lime juice 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper 6 (6 inch) whole wheat pita breads, halved 12 lettuce leaves DIRECTIONS In a bowl, combine the first nine ingredients; set aside. In a jar with tight-fitting lid, combine the oil, vinegar, mustard, honey, lime juice, garlic powder, salt, cumin and cayenne; shake well. Line pita halves with lettuce; fill each with about 1/3 cup vegetable mixture. Drizzle with dressing. Mexican Bush Bean Growing Organic The “Bush” in “Bush Bean” means it’s growth is controllable. It stays where it was planted and grows into a rounded bushy plant. It doesn’t want to climb on top of what ever is growing next to it like a pole bean would. You remember the story about Jack? However, like pole beans this bush bean is normally picked mature, hard and dry. In this respect it is similar...

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Purple Bush Bean | Go Grow Organic

Purple Bush Bean | Go Grow Organic

Purple Bush Bean produces long slightly curved dark purple pods that turn dark green when cooked. Excellent flavor and string-less but best picked when pods are young. They race up their supports, burst into shocking magenta flower, and then produce hundreds of gorgeous regal purple beans. The pods are attractive and round with a waxy finish. Ready to pick in around 52 days, they can be eaten whole or sliced. The taste is wonderfully fresh with a crisp, clean aftertaste and the fact that they are also stringless heightens the culinary experience. Best picked when around the thickness of a pencil and as with most legumes, the more you pick the better your crop will be.

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Black Turtle Bush Beans

Black Turtle Bush Beans

Black Turtle is a classic soup bean, that stores well and is an important sources of protein in vegetarian diets. It is especially well known in Latin American countries like Costa Rica."Pura Vida"! Black Bean flowers are esthetically pleasing as well as tasty. If you overproduced the plant, then start putting the flowers in your salads. Otherwise wait to harvest and store them as long as you like in the cupboard. Black Turtle Bush bean bods, ready to harvest tout a creamy white colored pod. "Black beans in a white pod?", you ask... Will nature never quite the jokes? I hope not. Phaseolus vulgaris Black Turtle is a classic soup bean, that can be stored well for up to a year or more, so don’t worry about planting too many. It’s primary use is  a dry shell bean. Great for the breakfast feast, eggs and Gillo Pinto. This hardy bush type has great disease resistance and does well even in drought and heat! If picked young, pods can also be used as a snap bean. It’s an oval bean that is jet black. It mature in about 90 days in a medium to large container. Black beans are widely used throughout Latin America, the  Caribbean, and the southern United States, especially in Florida and Texas. Black bean soups, stews and sauces are very common in Latin American  countries. Black beans are becoming more popular in the United States, due to increased immigration from Latin American countries, and the culinary traditions these immigrants bring with them. As are all legumes, Black Turtle beans are high in protein. Dried beans are important sources of protein in vegetarian diets especially. But note, it’s protein is incomplete and does not contain all 9 amino acids. Other grains will provide the missing amino acids or small amounts of dairy products, meat, poultry or fish. Fish contain the complete essential proteins. Long ago, via the 3 sisters style of planting in Central America and southern Mexico, corn supplied the missing amino acids, and squash was an additional source of vitamins. Black beans, as are all dried beans, are a good sources of starches, fiber, B vitamins, iron, zinc, phosphorus, complex carbohydrates and calcium. About half of the calcium is lost during cooking. High percentages of the other nutrients remain however, even after cooking.   Using Black Beans Cleaning Black Beans Black beans, like all dried beans, can be soaked before cooking. This hydration helps to reduce the cooking time, but it does effect nutrient content and flavor adversely. Because they are small, 2-4 hours soaking in cold water should suffice. Drain, and cook as per recipe. If you don’t have the time, boil the beans in water for 1-3 minutes, turn off heat, cover the pot and let them sit for one hour. Drain and proceed as per recipe. However, there is a problem with this quick soaking (boiling for 1-3 minutes) method. Hot water increases the solubility of the water soluble nutrients, and softens the cell membranes of the beans, further accelerating the loss of these nutrients. This should be a consideration, because of the long cooking time during which more nutrients are lost. Cold soaked and cooked at a very gentle simmer, beans retain most of their nutrients, which are considerable. Cooking Black Beans Drain the soaking water and add cold water, 1 part beans to 2 or 3 parts cold water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a very slow simmer, so the beans stay in their jackets. Simmer for 2 hours. See the video above for a great bean...

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Bean Seed Inoculation | Rhizobium Bacteria

Bean Seed Inoculation | Rhizobium Bacteria

Beans Produce their Own Fertilizer Bean Seed Inoculation helps legumes such as peas and beans to “fix” their own nitrogen. Beans produce much of their own nitrogen needs via a symbiotic relationship with a group of  bacteria called rhizobacteria or rhizobium. Rhizobium is a soil bacteria that fix nitrogen for legume plants. Our atmosphere contains more than 75% nitrogen gas (N2).  They convert the nitrogen gas in the atmosphere into ammonia nitrogen NH3+, a form usable by the plant.  Bean Seed Inoculation is important so as to ensure this bacteria-root dance. Colorado State University has a very well written page on Bean Seed Inoculation, if you are interested in reading the technical description of this process. Inoculating the seeds with Rhizobium bacteria before planting is helpful. Multifaceted Symbiosis All legumes, including beans, interact with the Rhizobium and interchanging metabolic fluids. Legume plants have the ability to form a symbiotic relationship with rhizobium bacteria. Inside the nodules, the bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen (N2) to ammonia NH3+, providing organic nitrogenous compounds to the plant. In return, the plant provides the bacteria with organic compounds made by photosynthesis. The bean’s roots exude certain carbohydrates for the bacteria and in return the bacteria produce nutrients. The carbohydrates are basic food stuffs for the bacteria. This encourages the rhizobia to adhere to it. The bacteria multiply on the roots surface and cause more root hairs to grow. On these root hairs begins a process called ‘nodule formation”. The bacteria colonize plant cells within root nodules. Inside these small tumors the bacteria induce specialized genes required for nitrogen fixation. This important function allows bean plants to convert nitrogen from the gaseous form found in the air N2, into a usable form. This allows beans to use this nitrogen for plant growth. Without these beneficial bacteria, beans cannot fix nitrogen. Soils normally do not contain many rhizobium bacteria. So it is necessary to inoculate the legume with the proper strains of bacteria prior to planting the seeds. Bean Seed Inoculation is a low-cost process which returns benefits many times higher than the costs. Bean Seed Inoculation | Rhizobium Bacteria Bean Seed Inoculation couldn’t be easier. There is no special procedure really. Take 500ml of the OST Rhizobium, which contains at least 109 rizobios/gram and add 2 tablespoons of crude sugar. Place your seeds in it for a few minutes. Some seeds like a dunking for a few hours. This all depends on the state of the seeds being planted. Imported, older seeds could need a bit more time to hydrate than fresh seeds recently harvested. Afterwards, just plant the seeds. There is no drenching of soil or anything more to do. If your supply of the inoculate is limited, then you might want to reuse the liquid. Store it away in a cool place for the next batch. It’ is always better to store your containers of fungus and bacterias in the refrigerator if your not performing Bean Seed Inoculation...

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