Foods to Live By

 

Fruits, nuts, grains, raw vegetables, special herbs, good water and tea are foods we might have not grown up with coming from a traditional family. Getting familiar with them has recently become an obvious choice. What do you want to learn about today? Below find some very interesting information that will help you to mature into a better frame of body and mind.

Fats and Oils

Fats and Oils

Oil is a type of fat. The only suitable oils are Virgin Olive, Cold Pressed Palm & Coconut Oil   Fats General Information Not all fat is bad for the body and your health. Well… it is if you consume too much of it or if you eat the wrong ones, such as saturated fats and trans fats. But in reality the healthy fats such as the monounsaturated fats, polyunsaturated fats, and omega-3s, are an important and essential part of our diet.  In fact, healthy fats play a huge role in helping you manage your moods, stay on top of your mental game, fight fatigue, and even control your weight. It is threw the fats we get our fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin E and the antioxidant Beta-carotene. If we eliminated all the fats in our diet we would die from vitamin deficiency. Some fats are so important they are called “essential” nutrients. The answer to managing our food-fats isn’t eliminating them, it’s learning to make healthy choices and to replace bad fats with good ones that promote health. But I am getting ahead of myself. To understand the differences between good and bad fats, you need to know their names and some information about them. Types of  Fats Unraveled There are actually only two categories of fats, saturated and unsaturated (which are divided into subcategories). “Saturated” refers to the chain of carbon atoms being fully “saturated” with hydrogen atoms or not. There are two types of unsaturated fats mono and poly. Both of these unsaturated fats are turned into an artificial-saturated fat when they are artificially “saturated” with hydrogen atoms in a very  harmful processing technique. The process of hydrogenation adds hydrogen atoms to unsaturated fats in order to make them more solid, such as margarine. Hydrogenated, unsaturated fats are called trans fats. So, from the two categories of fats, saturated and unsaturated the unsaturated is divided up into, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and then when either unsaturated is hydrogenated you have a trans fat. monounsaturated fats (liquid), hydrogenated monounsaturated fats→ trans fats (solid) polyunsaturated fats (liquid), hydrogenated polyunsaturated fats→ trans fats (solid) saturated fats (solid) trans fats (solid), is a hydrogenated mono or polyunsaturated fat↑ Trans Fats | Stay Away Appearance-wise, saturated fats and trans fats tend to be solid at room temperature (think of butter or traditional stick margarine), while monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats tend to be liquid (think of olive or coconut oil). Processors turning any unsaturated fats into hydrogenated fats, chemically converts the unsaturated vegetable oils into artificial saturated fats called trans fatty acids. This process thickens the liquidy unsaturated into a thick buttery texture similar to saturated fats and oils. A trans fat is a normal fat molecule that has been twisted and deformed during this process called hydrogenation. During this process, liquid vegetable oil is heated and combined with hydrogen gas. Partially hydrogenating vegetable oils makes them more stable and less likely to spoil, which is very good for food manufacturers—and very bad for our health. The Omega Essential fatty Acids Omega-3 and omega-6 are the only two essential fatty acids there are. They are considered essential because our body can not manufacture them. The only source is food. We need them for building healthy cells, and to maintaining brain and nerve function. Both, omega-3 and omega-6 are polyunsaturated fats. The best sources of these fatty acids are fish, fresh vegetables, nuts and seeds. What do they mean by Saturated and Unsaturated Saturated fatty acids (meat & milk) have no double bonds between the individual carbon atoms of the fatty acid chain. That is, the chain...

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Bell Peppers And Your Health

Bell Peppers And Your Health

There is a good reason to eat hot or sweet Bell Peppers for your health and not for just taste alone. When you grow peppers you are raising vitamins on a bush. Not only are they richer in vitamin C than oranges, they are also lower in calories. Growing bell peppers will make all of this nutrition available to you at a cost of just 33 calories per fruit. Nutrition is only the tip of the health iceberg. Refer to the bibliography at the bottom of this page. Peppers are used: used in the treatment of functional dyspepsia used in the in the management of surgical neuropathic pain in cancer patients used in treatment of the post-mastectomy pain syndrome used for cluster headache pain used as pain plaster in chronic non-specific low back pain used in in dermatology for treatment of itching and pain used in treatment of postherpetic neuralgia used to treat painful diabetic neuropathy used in the treatment of prurigo nodularis  jalapeno peppers are used for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection used in the treatment of prurigo nodularisprotects against aspirin-induced gastroduodenal mucosal injury used in the treatment of pain due to fibromyalgia reduces painful osteoarthritis of the hands used in the treatment of arthritis reduce chronic human neuropathic pain Bell peppers are low in calories! So, even if you eat one full cup of them, you get just about 45 calories. One cup will give you more than your daily quota of Vitamin A and C! One large green pepper contains approximately 287 mg of potassium They contain plenty of vitamin C, which powers up your immune system and keeps skin youthful.  The highest amount of Vitamin C in a bell pepper is concentrated in the red variety. Red bell peppers contain several phytochemicals and carotenoids,  particularly beta-carotene, which lavish you with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits. The capsaicin in bell peppers has multiple health benefits. Studies show that it reduces ‘bad’ cholesterol, controls diabetes, brings relief from pain and eases inflammation. If cooked for a short period on low heat, bell peppers retain most of their sweet, almost fruity flavor and flavonoid content, which is a powerful nutrient. The sulfur content in bell peppers makes them play a protective role in certain types of cancers. The bell pepper is a good source of Vitamin E, which is known to play a key role in keeping skin and hair looking youthful. Bell peppers also contain vitamin B6, which is essential for the health of the nervous system and helps renew cells. Certain enzymes in bell peppers, such as lutein, protect the eyes from cataracts and macular degeneration later in life. Bibliography of researched information concerning peppers and our health: 1. McCleane G. Topical application of doxepin hydrochloride, capsaicin and a combination of both produces analgesia in chronic human neuropathic pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2000;49:574-579. 2. Deal CL, Schnitzer TJ, Lipstein E, et al. Treatment of arthritis with topical capsaicin: A double blind trial. Clin Ther. 1991;13:383-395. 3. McCarthy GM, McCarty DJ. Effect of topical capsaicin in the therapy of painful osteoarthritis of the hands. J Rheumatol. 1992;19:604-607. 4. McCarty DJ, Csuka M, McCarthy, et al. Treatment of pain due to fibromyalgia with topical capsaicin: A pilot study. Semin Arthritis Rheum. 1994;23(suppl 3):41-47. 5. Yeoh KG, Kang JY, Yap I, et al. Chili protects against aspirin-induced gastroduodenal mucosal injury in humans. Dig Dis Sci. 1995;40:580-583. 6. Abdel Salam OM, Moszik G, Szolcsanyi J. Studies on the effect of intragastric capsaicin on gastric ulcer and on the prostacyclin-induced cytoprotection in rats. Pharmacol Res. 1995;32:209-215....

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