sweet-peppers-health-featuredThere is a good reason to eat hot or sweet Bell Peppers for your health and not for just taste alone. When you grow peppers you are raising vitamins on a bush. Not only are they richer in vitamin C than oranges, they are also lower in calories. Growing bell peppers will make all of this nutrition available to you at a cost of just 33 calories per fruit. Nutrition is only the tip of the health iceberg. Refer to the bibliography at the bottom of this page. Peppers are used:

  • used in the treatment of functional dyspepsia
  • used in the in the management of surgical neuropathic pain in cancer patients
  • used in treatment of the post-mastectomy pain syndrome
  • used for cluster headache pain
  • used as pain plaster in chronic non-specific low back pain
  • used in in dermatology for treatment of itching and pain
  • used in treatment of postherpetic neuralgia
  • used to treat painful diabetic neuropathy
  • used in the treatment of prurigo nodularis
  •  jalapeno peppers are used for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection
  • used in the treatment of prurigo nodularisprotects against aspirin-induced gastroduodenal mucosal injury
  • used in the treatment of pain due to fibromyalgia
  • reduces painful osteoarthritis of the hands
  • used in the treatment of arthritis
  • reduce chronic human neuropathic pain
  • Bell peppers are low in calories! So, even if you eat one full cup of them, you get just about 45 calories.
  • One cup will give you more than your daily quota of Vitamin A and C!
  • One large green pepper contains approximately 287 mg of potassium
  • They contain plenty of vitamin C, which powers up your immune system and keeps skin youthful.  The highest amount of Vitamin C in a bell pepper is concentrated in the red variety.
  • Red bell peppers contain several phytochemicals and carotenoids,  particularly beta-carotene, which lavish you with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits.
  • The capsaicin in bell peppers has multiple health benefits. Studies show that it reduces ‘bad’ cholesterol, controls diabetes, brings relief from pain and eases inflammation.
  • If cooked for a short period on low heat, bell peppers retain most of their sweet, almost fruity flavor and flavonoid content, which is a powerful nutrient.
  • The sulfur content in bell peppers makes them play a protective role in certain types of cancers.
  • The bell pepper is a good source of Vitamin E, which is known to play a key role in keeping skin and hair looking youthful.
  • Bell peppers also contain vitamin B6, which is essential for the health of the nervous system and helps renew cells.
  • Certain enzymes in bell peppers, such as lutein, protect the eyes from cataracts and macular degeneration later in life.

Bibliography of researched information concerning peppers and our health:

1. McCleane G. Topical application of doxepin hydrochloride, capsaicin and a combination of both produces analgesia in chronic human neuropathic pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2000;49:574-579.

2. Deal CL, Schnitzer TJ, Lipstein E, et al. Treatment of arthritis with topical capsaicin: A double blind trial. Clin Ther. 1991;13:383-395.

3. McCarthy GM, McCarty DJ. Effect of topical capsaicin in the therapy of painful osteoarthritis of the hands. J Rheumatol. 1992;19:604-607.

4. McCarty DJ, Csuka M, McCarthy, et al. Treatment of pain due to fibromyalgia with topical capsaicin: A pilot study. Semin Arthritis Rheum. 1994;23(suppl 3):41-47.

5. Yeoh KG, Kang JY, Yap I, et al. Chili protects against aspirin-induced gastroduodenal mucosal injury in humans. Dig Dis Sci. 1995;40:580-583.

6. Abdel Salam OM, Moszik G, Szolcsanyi J. Studies on the effect of intragastric capsaicin on gastric ulcer and on the prostacyclin-induced cytoprotection in rats. Pharmacol Res. 1995;32:209-215.

7. Holzer P, Pabst MA, Lippe IT. Intragastric capsaicin protects against aspirin-induced lesion formation and bleeding in the rat gastric mucosa. Gastroenterology. 1989;96:1425-1433.

8. Stander S, Luger T, Metze D. Treatment of prurigo nodularis with topical capsaicin. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2001;44:471-478.

9. Graham DY, Anderson SY, Lang T. Garlic or jalapeno peppers for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection. Am J Gastroenterol. 1999;94:1200-1202.

10. Rodriguez-Stanley S, Collings KL, Robinson M, et al. The effects of capsaicin on reflux, gastric emptying and dyspepsia. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2000;14:129-134.

11. Graham DY, Smith JL, Opekun AR. Spicy food and the stomach. Evaluation by videoendoscopy. JAMA. 1988;260:3473-3475.

12. Bouraoui A, Toumi A, Mustapha HB, et al. Effects of capsicum fruit on theophylline absorption and bioavailability in rabbits. Drug Nutr Interact. 1998;5:345-350.

13. Bortolotti M, Coccia G, Grossi G, et al. The treatment of functional dyspepsia with red pepper. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2002;16:1075-1082.

14. Watson CP, Evans RJ, Watt VR. Post-herpetic neuralgia and topical capsaicin. Pain.1988;33:333-340.

15. Watson CP, Tyler KL, Bickers DR, et al. A randomized vehicle-controlled trial of topical capsaicin in the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. Clin Ther. 1993;15:510-526.

16. Alper BS, Lewis PR. Treatment of postherpetic neuralgia: a systematic review of the literature. J Fam Pract. 2002;51:121-128.

17. Low PA, Opfer-Gehrking TL, Dyck PJ, et al. Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the application of capsaicin cream in chronic distal painful polyneuropathy. Pain. 1995;62:163-168.

18. Biesbroeck R, Bril V, Hollander P, et al. A double-blind comparison of topical capsaicin and oral amitriptyline in painful diabetic neuropathy. Adv Ther. 1995;12:111-120.

19. The Capsaicin Study Group. Effect of treatment with capsaicin on daily activities of patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Diabetes Care. 1992;15:159-165.

20. Tandan R, Lewis GA, Krusinski PB, Badger GB, Fries TJ. Related Articles Topical capsaicin in painful diabetic neuropathy. Controlled study with long-term follow-up. Diabetes Care. 1992;15:8-14.

21. The Capsaicin Study Group. Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy with topical capsaicin. A multicenter, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study. Arch Intern Med. 1991;151:2225-2229.

22. Scheffler NM, Sheitel PL, Lipton MN. Related Articles Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy with capsaicin 0.075%. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 1991; 81:288-293.

23. Jensen PG, Larson JR. Management of painful diabetic neuropathy. Drugs Aging.2 001;18:737-749.

24. Ellison N, Loprinzi CL, Kugler J, et al. Phase III placebo-controlled trial of capsaicin cream in the management of surgical neuropathic pain in cancer patients. J Clin Oncol. 1997;15:2974-2980.

25. Dini D, Bertelli G, Gozza A, et al. Treatment of the post-mastectomy pain syndrome with topical capsaicin. Pain. 1993;54:223-226.

26. Watson CP, Evans RJ. The postmastectomy pain syndrome and topical capsaicin: a randomized trial. Pain. 1992;51:375-379.

27. Watson CP, Evans RJ, Watt VR. et al. The post-mastectomy pain syndrome and the effect of topical capsaicin. Pain. 1989;38:177-186.

28. Todd C. Meeting the therapeutic challenge of the patient with osteoarthritis. J Am Pharm Assoc (Wash). 2002;42:74-82.

29. Marks DR, Rapoport A, Padla D, et al. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of intranasal capsaicin for cluster headache. Cephalalgia. 1993;13:114-116.

30. Keitel W, Frerick H, Kuhn U, Schmidt U, Kuhlmann M, Bredehorst A. Capsicum pain plaster in chronic non-specific low back pain. Arzneimittelforschung. 2001;51:896-903.

31. Ellis CN, Berberian B, Sulica VI, et al. A double-blind evaluation of topical capsaicin in pruritic psoriasis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1993;29:438-442.

32. Bernstein JE, Parish LC, Rapaport M, et al. Effects of topically applied capsaicin on moderate and severe psoriasis vulgaris. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1986;15:504-507.

33. Reimann S, Luger T, Metze D. Topical administration of capsaicin in dermatology for treatment of itching and pain. Hautarzt. 2000;51:164-172.

– See more at: http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/NaturalFood/Cayenne.aspx#biblio